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WildAid Convenes Religious Leaders to Fight Poaching in Tanzania

WildAid: Tanzania interfaith workshop

Photo: 52 prominent religious leaders attend an interfaith workshop for wildlife hosted by WildAid in Tanzania on February 11. Courtesy Salome Gasabile

Hong Kong Lawmaker Pushes for Ivory Ban

Photo: Hong Kong legislative councillor Dr. Elizabeth Quat, © Alex Hofford/WildAid

Movement is afoot to crack down on one of the world’s largest illegal ivory markets that’s fueling the rampant slaughter of African elephants.  

2015: A Critical Year for Saving the World’s Rhinos

Thandi and calf, photo by Adrian Steirn/Kariega Game Reserve

Whether Thandi and her new calf will be enduring symbols of survival or merely a blip of good news in the tragic war against brutal rhino poaching has yet to be seen. Despite hundreds of South African National Defence Force troops and sophisticated drone technology being deployed to intercept poachers in South Africa’s parks, numbers of dead rhino continue to increase. A record 1,215 rhinos were illegally killed in that country last year, up from 1,004 in 2013 and 668 in 2012. The high prices paid for rhino horn on black markets in China and Vietnam are financing corruption and sophisticated international criminal networks that are very difficult to defeat as we have in the “war on drugs.”

From Uganda to China, Illegal Pangolin Trade Makes News

Cape/Temminck’s Ground Pangolin, photo by David Brossard

A precipitous spike in rhino and elephant poaching has dominated environmental news headlines in recent weeks, with record numbers of rhinos killed in South Africa last year and sting operations in multiple African nations uncovering elephant ivory bound for Asian markets. 

But look closer at the coverage, and you may also read about one obscure animal equally imperiled by the illegal wildlife trade — and a fraction the physical size of these megafauna.

Record Number of Rhinos Killed in South Africa Last Year

Poachers killed a record number of rhinos in South Africa last year, according to government figures released Thursday (January 22). A total of 1,215 rhinos were poached in 2014 — ten times the number killed in 2009. During the first three weeks of 2015, 49 rhinos have already been poached in South Africa. 

Although rhinos were recovering in Africa since 1993, increasing demand across China and Vietnam in recent years is reversing that trend. Belief in its purported health benefits, including treatment for cancer, fever reduction and other health problems, remains relatively high in Vietnam, despite the fact that rhino horn is composed of compressed hair and keratin, the same protein found in fingernails. 

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