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Kicking the habitat: Athletes weigh in for wildlife

With his fierce reputation in the ring, Cambodia's most famous kickboxer, Ei Puthang, may seem an unlikely choice as the new ambassador for environmental NGO WildAid. But there is a strong and long-standing connection between kickboxing and the pillaging of wildlife, says the head of the organization, Suwanna Gauntlett.

China Wildlife Consumption Survey Results Launched

The China Wildlife Consumption Survey results were released on April 18 2006 in Beijing. The survey results suggest that the percentage of the public eating wild animals has decreased, and the public awareness on wildlife conservation has improved. The government is taking active measures to stop illegal wildlife consumption for the sustainable development of wildlife resources.

Conservation Groups Say More Chinese Avoid Eating Wild Animals

The percentage of Chinese eating wild animals has gone down, mainly due to fears of diseases such as SARS. But at the same time total consumption of exotic wildlife has increased.

More and more Chinese refrain from eating rare animals such as pangolins, civet cats or bears. A nationwide survey, released by U.S. and Chinese conservation groups in Beijing on Tuesday, shows that nearly three quarters of the people interviewed did not consume wildlife in the past year.

Wildlife Conservation Program Marks 10 Years

"When the buying stops, the killing can stop, too."

If there is a diminishing demand for rhino horns, elephant tusks, tiger furs and bones, bear claws and bile, and sharks' fins, then the poaching and killing of endangered animals will gradually decline.

This was the message of Peter Knights, a British environmentalist and conservationist running the San Francisco-based WildAid, as he spoke in Taipei to mark the considerable progress made in the campaign to save endangered species.

Tribute to Peter Benchley, Author and Conservationist

WildAid lost a dear friend this week as author and ocean advocate Peter Benchley sadly passed away, aged 65. Our condolences and best wishes are with his wife, Wendy, and the rest of their family in Princeton, New Jersey.

Peter had been seriously ill since last year, but when I last spoke to him we had hoped that his health would return and we were looking forward to traveling together again and perhaps even getting to dive with sharks, as he would have been writing an article about our work to protect sharks in the Galapagos and Asia.

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