Pledge About

Thailand

Thais go #IvoryFree with WildAid and USAID

Celebrities, business leaders, politicians, sports stars and other influential Thais nationwide are joining the #IvoryFree campaign, a social media movement and pledge to never buy, use or give ivory as gifts. 

More than 100 Thai celebrities and some of the country's most influential personalities have joined WildAid and USAID Wildlife Asia's joint campaign, called "I am #IvoryFree," to deter the purchase of ivory in Thailand.

View the campaign.

Thailand eating too much shark fin, a worrying sign for shark populations worldwide

More than half of Thais have eaten shark fin and plan to consume it again in the future. A large proportion of people remain unaware about the magnitude and cruelty of the shark fin trade, suggesting a concerning potential for increased demand for fins in Thailand, according to a new report released today by WildAid.

In addition, Thailand exports a significant amount of shark fin products, further increasing its impact on shark populations. The report "Shark Fin Demand in Thailand" compiles data on Thailand's role in the shark fin trade and results from a shark fin consumer survey conducted by WildAid and Rapid Asia.

Thai Business Leaders Pledge to be Ivory Free with WildAid

Thai business leaders take WildAid's ivory free pledge

On Thai Elephant Day, WildAid united 15 prominent Thai business leaders with a pledge to never use elephant ivory or other wildlife products.

In a show of solidarity, the nation's top business leaders joined our call and urged stronger enforcement and more effective wildlife conservation action.

Thailand is a major destination market and trans-shipment hub to China and other markets for ivory products primarily from some of the roughly 33,000 elephants poached annually in Africa.

Martial Arts Actor Tony Jaa Leads New 'Ivory Free' Thailand Campaign

 WildAid and WWF-Thailand representatives with Tony Jaa (center) at the June 13 launch in Bangkok

BANGKOK (14 June 2016) — International martial arts actor Tony Jaa (Furious 7Ong-Bak 3) and Thai National Football Team Coach Zico” Kiatisuk Senamuang will lead an all-star team of celebrity ambassadors calling for an end to Thailand’s ivory trade, one of the world’s largest. 

The new campaign, created by WildAid and WWF-Thailand and launched Monday, highlights the impact of the Thai ivory trade on elephant poaching in Africa, where an estimated 33,000 elephants are killed each year for their tusks. Public service announcements and print billboards will be widely distributed throughout the country, from BTS SkyTrain stations in Bangkok to several national TV channels and multiple social media platforms. WATCH: Tony Jaa’s new PSA for WildAid and WWF-ThailandThis PSA was produced by WildAid with the support of WWF, African Wildlife Foundation and Save the Elephants. 

The ivory trade has been banned in the United States, and proposed bans in China and Hong Kong are in motion, leaving Thailand alongside Japan as the largest remaining markets. Thailand also plays a key role as a transit point for smuggled ivory: Current Thai law allows trading of ivory from domesticated Thai elephants, but conservationists are concerned that illegal African ivory is laundered through this loophole.  

Thailand made several major illegal ivory seizures last year: Since October 2015, Thai customs has made four seizures of ivory originating from Africa, totaling more than 800 kilograms. The latest seizure in April 2016 was more than 300 kilograms. 

“With historic announcements from the US, China and Hong Kong to shut down their ivory markets, the time has come for Thailand to join the herd and do its part to save Africa’s elephants,” said WildAid CEO Peter Knights.

Thailand Destroys Over 2 Tons of Ivory

In a significant show of support for Africa's elephants, Thailand officials crushed over two tons of confiscated ivory on Wednesday, including tusks, carvings and trinkets that were pulverized with a hammer mill and later incinerated.

The nation's first-ever ivory destruction ceremony began with Buddhist and Brahmin faith leaders praying for at least 200 elephants that had been slaughtered for their ivory that was destroyed. Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, who presided over the ceremony, said the crush would not be a one-off event, and that Thailand is committed to fighting the illegal wildlife trade.

"The destruction of confiscated ivory in Bangkok will not in itself put an end to the illegal trade," CITES Secretary-General John E. Scanlon said in a statement. "It is, however, ensuring that no one will ever profit from this contraband. When coupled with seizures, prosecution and conviction of offenders, it sends a powerful message that Thailand does not and will not tolerate this illegal trade."

WWF Thailand and Freeland were involved in auditing the ivory stockpile as well as overseeing the destruction process. "This event aligns the commitment of the Thai government and the will of Thai people with the global priority of stopping the illegal ivory trade," said WWF’s Janpai Ongsiriwittaya, who participated in the audit.